x

Search

About Us – Masterpeace

MasterPeace is an award-winning global grassroots non-profit and non-governmental peace movement, currently existing in more than 40 countries around the world.

MasterPeace was launched in 2011, with the aim to mobilize people around the world to use their talent and energy for peacebuilding and togetherness. Through music, sports, arts, and dialogue, MasterPeace will help lead the way to a more sustainable world with less (armed) conflict.

MasterPeace focuses on actively engaging people around the world in peace-building actions. The world has seven billion inhabitants. We view them as seven billion sources of talent and energy. To achieve all that, MasterPeace offers a platform for a large community of Nelsons; social entrepreneurs, volunteers, bloggers, journalists, media, musicians, businesses and active citizens to connect together and support with actions.

By 2013, MasterPeace was awarded by the Secretary-General of the United Nations Mr. Ban Ki-moon, the ‘innovation in peacebuilding’ award on behalf of the United Nations Correspondents Association (UNCA).

Read our MasterPeace Vision & Strategy 2020 Here.

MasterPeace Around The World

MasterPeace is currently active in over 40  countries around the world, with regional offices in Utrecht, The Netherlands, Cairo, Egypt and Mexico City, Mexico, through MasterPeace clubs, the on the ground arm of MasterPeace, we are engaging tens of thousands of new peace activists in local peace initiatives and developing a ‘culture of peace’ in order to prevent new armed conflicts.

MasterPeace organizes global and local events, innovative campaigning, events, leadership training & capacity building events, to encourage the active involvements of youth from around the world in topics of social change, peacebuilding, and community cohesion, aligning up efforts to help contribute to the world’s SDGs goals.

What People do

On the International Day of Peace, also known as Peace Day, people around the world take part in various activities and organize events centered on the theme “peace”. Events vary from private gatherings to public concerts and forums involving large audiences. Activities include:

  • Interfaith peace ceremonies.
  • A toast for peace.
  • A peace choir.
  • Lighting candles.
  • Peace Prayers.
  • A peace convoy of vehicles.
  • Tree planting for peace.
  • Art exhibitions promoting peace.
  • Picnics for peace.
  • Peace walks.

Organizations such as Roots & Shoots, an international environmental and humanitarian program for youth, show their support for the event on an annual basis. Young people involved in Roots & Shoots may engage in activities such as crafting giant peace dove puppets from re-used materials and flying the doves in their communities. People from diverse religious and spiritual backgrounds also commit to organizing an International Day of Peace Vigil. Some groups observe a minute of silence at noon in every time zone across the world on Peace Day.

Public life

The UN’s International Day of Peace is a global observance and not a public holiday. It is a day when nations around the world are invited to honor a cessation of hostilities during the day.

Background

A UN resolution established the International Day of Peace in 1981 to coincide with the opening of the UN General Assembly. The first Peace Day was celebrated in 1982 and was held on the third Tuesday of September each year until 2002, when September 21 became the permanent date for the International Day of Peace. The assembly decided in 2001 that the International Day of Peace should be annually observed on September 21 starting from 2002. By setting a fixed date for the International Day of Peace, the assembly declared that the day should be observed as a day of global ceasefire and non-violence.

By creating the International Day of Peace, the UN devoted itself to worldwide peace and encouraged people to work in cooperation for this goal. Since its inception, Peace Day has marked personal and planetary progress toward peace. It has grown to include millions of people worldwide and many events are organized each year to commemorate and celebrate this day.

Symbols

The peace dove flying with an olive branch in its beak is one of the most commonly featured symbols for the day. In Judaism, Christianity, and Islam a white dove is generally a sign for peace. The dove can also represent “hope for peace” or a peace offering from one person to another, hence the phrase “to extend an olive branch”. Often, the dove is represented as still in flight to remind people of its role as messenger.

OUR PARTNERS